Bishop arrested for drunken driving

Priests are people, too.

I just read this breaking news that Bishop Robert J. McManus, head of the Diocese of Worcester, was arrested for driving under the influence this weekend after police stopped him in Narragansett, R.I., police said.

McManus was arrested at 10:32 p.m. Saturday on charges of drunken driving, leaving the scene of an accident, and refusing a chemical test, Narragansett Police Captain Sean Coorigan said. McManus is to be arraigned Tuesday in district court in Wakefield, R.I.

In a meeting the other day, people were sharing about how many times they drove drunk and didn’t get stopped. Hundreds of times. When you think about it, this is very scary. When we are driving our families around at night, we may very well cross paths with drunk drivers. I did it. It’s horrible.

So, now a Bishop has been arrested for drunk driving. He should know better right? We ALL should know better.

Just don’t do it.

Catholic Priests, Nuns and Religious Recover from Alcoholism through Guest House

00000000000000000000000000I just received this email from my affiliation with Guest House.

Guest House is an essential/vital /necessary/absolutely wonderful mission that helps Catholic priests, nuns and religious start the road to recovery from alcoholism. Worthy, worthy, worth charity. Please help out if you are financially able.  Here is the letter I just received from them promoting their new e-learning project, and I couldn’t wait to share so I am sharing verbatim:

***

Guest House is North America’s founding behavioral health and addiction program for Catholic clergy and religious.  Since 1956, we’ve provided personalized clinical treatment with a spiritual emphasis.  Our goal is focused:  To successfully return men and women to their mission.  Our accredited full time clinical staff provides these services at our tranquil, private residential facilities.

To provide such important treatment, education and recovery to more than 8,000 clients since our inception, we’ve constantly sought out new and innovative ways to treat, reach, educate, serve and follow-up with our clients.  As part of our mission to the Church, we have recognized that the valuable information compiled in our field is crucial to all servants of the Church, and all advocates of education, prevention, intervention, treatment and lifelong sobriety, including:

  • Key decision makers within Orders and Dioceses
  • Hospitals, health systems and other agencies who provide behavioral health services
  • Therapists, social workers and others who must maintain Continuing Education Units (CEU’s)
  • Our alumni and alumnae
  • Family members
  • Parishioners
  • Students
  • Seminarians
  • Donors
  • Volunteers
  • Our dedicated staff
  • Teachers and educators

I’m pleased to tell you of  a significant new Guest House initiative.

Education is a critical part of awareness for the many and varied audiences we serve.  Debuting in April, 2013 is a Guest House and NCCA (National Catholic Council on Addictions) comprehensive e-learning educational library. Offerings are made possible through an affiliation with  Essential Learning, LLC., a corporation that offers online learning, staff compliance training and continuing education for behavioral health, mental health, addiction treatment, community health, developmental disability, community action and child welfare organizations.  The cost for users runs from $8.00 for some individual courses to a high of $99.00 for a series of online lessons.

  • Available exclusively on-line via http://www.guesthouse.org/education
  • Catalogue incorporates nearly 500 course selections
  • More than 800 training hours available using the most contemporary digital techniques
  • No other Catholic addiction treatment facility has such extensive content available to you
  • Library is designed for everyone from Church leadership through medical and addiction   treatment  professionals; CEU units are available
  • Courses from adolescents to aging; ethics, risk management and leadership techniques

As always, thanks to so many of you for your ongoing support of Guest House and NCCA in our critical endeavors. Whether we are providing Catholic clergy and religious addiction treatment and prevention, education or recovery, always remember, “Guest House Heals!”  Find out more and follow our Blog at guesthouse.org.

Spring 2013 Issue of Twelve-Step Review: Christian Friendship

12A wonderful, and under-marketed project by Father Emmerich Vogt, OP is the Twelve Step Review. He writes and sends out a quarterly newsletter on topics relevant to Catholic alcoholics and also provides CDs and DVDs of his talks about recovery. Father Vogt has published a book The Freedom to Love on the subject of adapting the 12 Steps to a serious understanding of the Seven Deadly Sins.

This issue of the Twelve Step Review covers Christian Friendship, inspirational quotes from Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat, as well as information on Father Vogt’s most recent talks and recordings.

Here is a quote from the newsletter and the book of Sirach on Christian friendship:

A faithful friend is a strong defense. He that has found him has found a treasure. Nothing can be compared to a faithful friend and no weight of gold and silver can countervail the goodness of his fidelity. A faithful friend is the medicine of life and immortality. The book of Sirach 6:5-17

The emphasis here seems to be on the “faithful” friend.  We all know there are many other kinds of friends (Facebook “friends,” acquaintances, business contacts) but the “faithful” friend is a treasure.  Let’s hope we each have one or two of these types of friends in our lives!  I do, thank you God.

Pet Peeves

I’m wondering where the term “pet peeves” came from.  I’ll look it up via the lazy man’s route to information: wikipedia.

A pet peeve is a minor annoyance that an individual identifies as particularly annoying to them, to a greater degree than others may find it.  Its first usage was around 1919.The term is a back-formation from the 14th-century word peevish, meaning “ornery or ill-tempered”.

Pet peeves often involve specific behaviors of someone close, such as a spouse or significant other.These behaviors may involve disrespect, manners, personal hygiene, relationships, and family issues.

A key aspect of a pet peeve is that it may well seem acceptable to others.

One of my pet peeves is when people apologize, when they share at the meeting, for being late to an AA meeting.  Another is bloggers who apologize for not having posted very much lately—-so I’m not going to apologize for not posting at all lately.

200 Bottles of Beer on the Wall

numbers-200Thank you so much! I just noticed I now have 200 “followers,” which is so cool for this girl from Alpharetta, Georgia.  Some of you may follow me because of my experiences in alcoholism and recovery and some because of my experiences as a Catholic.

I appreciate all of your comments and insight as I write daily about things that come to my mind.

But most of all, I enjoy reading YOUR blogs. From you I learn so much about what it means to be a friend among friends, no better and no worse than anybody else.  Have a happy, holy Good Friday everybody!

Number 9

 

Sober Sundays: What the heck is that?

sober sundays

This “Sober Sundays” link-up is party time. And you’re invited to the party. There are TWO WAYS to participate:

The super easy sober simple way to participate:

  1. Follow the prompts at the bottom of the current party to simply add any link to your favorite post (preferably, but not necessarily, written by you) from the previous week that might help someone who has recently quit or plans to quit drinking.

Or, for the computer and technically inclines: IMHO “best” way to participate:

  1. Write a short post entitled “Sober Sundays.” (see sample)
  2. In it, write at least FIVE things you are grateful for today. The first five things that come to mind.
  3. After your gratitude list, link to one of your favorite sober posts from the past week to share your experience, strength and hope with the newcomer.
  4. Insert the “Sober Sundays” image button (simply “save as” image) in your post somewhere
  5. Be sure to put a link back to the current party somewhere in your post so people will be sure to come over here and check out the whole party.
  6. Publish!
  7.  Follow the prompts at the bottom of the current party to link to your newly written Sober Sundays post.

Let’s especially share the ones that offer the most hope to the newcomer, the fellow alcoholic who has decided today’s the day they’re going to quit for good.

We will use this page to keep a running list of the weekly parties:

Sober Sundays vol. 1    3.17.2013

Sober Sundays vol. 2    3.24.2013

Sober Sundays vol. 3    4.7.2013

“Sunday is the golden clasp that binds together the volume of the week.”
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

In the end, this is an example of what the link up looks like:link up

Here is a 150X150 button.sober sundays

sober sundaysHere is a 300X300 button.

100 Followers!

Yay! Party! I just got my 100th follower!